Can you stream through zoom and youtube simultaneously

The Digital Culture Network has created nine guides to help you succeed and thrive in the Digital World. Here is the second guide: How to stream a Zoom meeting to YouTube.

This guide describes the steps to be taken in order to stream a Zoom meeting via YouTube for webinars. It outlines how you can use the powerful functionality of Zoom alongside the unrestricted options and benefits of YouTube.

Platforms Overview

Zoom is good for video encoding and presenting functionality. There is other software available for this, such as Open Broadcaster Software (OBS) but it isn’t as intuitive to use. However, areas to consider around Zoom are:

  • Some users have had difficulty downloading and using Zoom to watch webinars and are wary of privacy concerns
  • Zoom Pro accounts have a limit of 100 attendees
  • There is an additional cost for the Webinar add on for view-only attendees

The benefits of streaming a Zoom meeting via YouTube for attendees to watch it include:

  • No need to see the attendees
  • It has a built-in chat facility for 2-way live communication
  • There is no cap on the view-only attendees
  • Users most likely have the app installed already or are familiar with the web interface
  • The recording is automatically saved for you to edit and publish afterwards

Note: A YouTube account needs 24 hours to activate live streaming for the very first time you use it. Do a test run in advance of your actual webinar.

Enabling Live Streaming in Zoom

In the Zoom account settings scroll down to In Meeting (Advanced) section to Allow live streaming meetings. Toggle the button on the right to turn this service on.

There are four options given in this section. The first three are if you want to be able to stream any meeting live on the platforms at any time on an ad-hoc basis. For the purposes of this setup you need to tick the last option, Custom Live Streaming Service as this is for a scheduled live streamed webinar.

Set up a scheduled livestream in YouTube

Go to YouTube, click the camera+ icon in the top right and click Go live from the dropdown options.

Note: If you do not already have a YouTube channel you will be asked to create one. This will need verifying via phone/text message.

Here you will be asked to enter the details of your new stream.

  • Title – The name of the webinar
  • Visibility
    • Public – It is searchable by anyone on YouTube and appears on your channel
    • Unlisted – Only people with the direct link will find it. (This is the option we have used for our webinars as we want people to register in advance. We then switch it to Public once the event has passed and it has been transcribed).
    • Private – Only you can view it
  • Category – Choose what type of content it is e.g. Educational
  • Description – What is the webinar about? This appears under the video.
  • Schedule for later – Toggle this to yes and set the date and time of your webinar
  • Upload a custom thumbnail – If you have created a holding slide or have a suitable image it can be added. The size needs to be 1280 × 720 pixels.
  • Audience – Select if the webinar is specifically made for children or not

Click Create Stream.

This will load the control room where you can set the webinar to Go Live and moderate the live chat. For now, we need the stream key (the unique ID for your feed – do not share this with anyone) and the stream URL (e.g. rtmp://a.rtmp.youtube.com/live2).

You will also need the shareable link for the YouTube livestream. Click the arrow icon in the top right and copy the URL.

Setting up a scheduled webinar in Zoom

Over on Zoom, schedule a meeting for the date and time required. From the Upcoming Meetings page, click into your new meeting.

Scroll down to the bottom and click the Live Streaming tab. Underneath the LIVE icon, click the link to configure the stream settings.

The popup window will ask you to paste in the settings we copied from YouTube.

Note: If you have browser autofill settings on for login, it may paste in your email and password. Clear these before pasting in the settings from YouTube.

Going live

When your webinar date and time comes around, get Zoom up and running 15 minutes before you are due to go live on YouTube. Click Start This Meeting on Zoom. At this point, only you can see the video feed so you can test out sharing your screen and if your microphone is working correctly. When you are happy with everything, click on the three dots/More button in the Zoom options bar and click Live on Custom Live Streaming Service. This will start sending the stream to the YouTube control room. The audience cannot see you yet!

The Zoom video feed will then appear in the YouTube control room.

Ideally you would have a second person looking after the YouTube control room. It is operated via the website so no need to use the same device or be in the same location.

Note: There is a lag of about 18 seconds from what you are doing on Zoom and what appears in YouTube.

Meanwhile, this is what users see when they are waiting on YouTube:

Note: This is why a good thumbnail image is important!

When you’re ready, get your assistant to press GO LIVE in the YouTube control room.

Your attendees will now be able to see the live broadcast on YouTube:

Any messages that are put in the chat by users are visible in the YouTube control room where your assistant can delete and ban any comments if necessary. You can also send replies as your channel. For our webinars, we use a phone with the YouTube stream on it (with volume off) so we can keep track of any comments in the live chat and respond to them as part of my webinar content. Remember, there is an 18 second lag between what your audience are seeing and what you are doing on Zoom.

When your webinar is finished, click the END STREAM button in the YouTube control room. You can then leave the Zoom meeting.

The recording will automatically save to YouTube studio where you can edit the video, add extra information such as description and tags, and (importantly) transcribe the audio.

Congratulations! You’ve just a streamed a fantastic webinar to YouTube. Sit back, relax and have a nice cup of tea.

Further Support:

The Digital Culture Network is here to support you and your organisation. If you need help or would like to chat with them about any of the advice they have covered above, please get in touch. Email digitalnetwork@artscouncil.org.uk with some background information about you, your location and your current dilemma, and they will connect you with one of our 9 Tech Champions for some in-depth 1-2-1 support.

Sign up to the DCN newsletter and follow them on Twitter @ace_dcn for latest updates.

Arts Council England allows Theatreis.Digital to republish this resource, under the terms of the Open Government Licence.

Find the resource in his original page here.

How to make a great video with a smartphone

The Digital Culture Network has created nine guides to help you succeed and thrive in the Digital World. Here is the sixth guide: Producing Video Content.

This resource provides information and advice on making video content using a smartphone. As well as considerations for generating content, it contains advice on hardware, software and distribution.

Why Video

Video has proven to be more engaging and more memorable than any other medium. Great video can illustrate a story and take the audience on a journey. By producing videos that offer the audience a glimpse behind the scenes of a production or an in-depth review of a museum’s artefact, audiences have the chance to see much more of an organisation’s personality and what makes them so unique.

Typically videos produced for YouTube have a longer run time than Instagram, Facebook or Twitter. But don’t aim to reach a certain run time, quality not quantity is the name of the game here. If a video is perfectly right for its audience it doesn’t matter if it’s 5, 10 or 25 minutes long.

The absolute focus of your video should always be on the story, answering the questions below internally will help you determine whether it’s going to be right for your organisation.

  • Why should my audience watch this video?
  • What will this video say about our organisation?
  • Why will people want to see more from us after watching this video?

Audiences have relatively short concentration spans with video, so you should always look to keep your video moving along as swiftly as possible. Also it helps to start with impact, explain what the video is about, what you will cover and aim to do that within the first 30 seconds.

Long drawn out intros might look impressive but if the audience fails to understand the video’s significance to them they will simply move on and in doing so harm your statistics in the eyes of the algorithms.

There are billions of people in the world and millions of niche interests, so don’t convince yourself that your voice isn’t important, it is!

With your knowledge, passion and incredible access to behind the scenes action, you are in an incredible position to produce engaging content that will most likely be loved and shared.

Essential building blocks for a successful video

A quick glance at YouTube will illustrate this next part perfectly, but the most successful videos on YouTube are videos that don’t sell but inspire and inform. It is worth thinking of video like the scene in Jerry Maguire where Jerry says: “Help me, help you.”

  • What is the purpose of your video?  Are you trying to educate an audience? Are you trying to raise awareness of your subject?
  • What makes your idea or point-of-view unique?
  • Do you have at least some expertise on your subject matter? Why should people watch your video and value your opinions?
  • Is your video best suited to be factual, regular entertainment show or a feature case-study piece? How are you planning to structure it? Will it be just one “personality” on their own or will you be able to bring in guests, and if so, can this be done on a regular basis?
  • Is there an appetite for putting in the effort? No one ever made it to the top on their first, second or third video it takes time, a lot of time! Everyone starts with zero views and you and your team need to be prepared for the long haul.
  • Have you got the right equipment for the kind of videos you want to make?

Types of videos

The types of videos that you can make depends a lot on your time and resources. Here’s a guide to the most popular videos and what goes into making them.

Type Description      Example

Solo Piece to Camera

Commentary

Reviews

How To’s

Inspirational

Only got a camera and mic? Prepared to talk to yourself for hours and edit the best bits? Well in that case these types of content are a great way of educating, informing and inspiring your audience when all you have is yourself.

     Casey Neistat

Peter Mckinnon

Sunny Lenarduzzi

Interview style

Chat show

Commentary

How To’s

Inspirational

Got friends and an extra mic? A conversation is probably one of the easiest things to film if you have at least one camera and two mics. It’s also great to get to know the subject and uncover aspects from someone else’s perspective.

     Objectivity

Numberphile

Documentary Style Lots of time and equipment with a story that needs telling? Well although these types of videos are hard to pull off and are often less engaging, they do have the power to stick around and be entertaining for many years to come.

     Real Stories

RT Documentary

The equipment

We have got all this way and only now are we covering equipment! That’s because the greatest camera in the world doesn’t equate to the greatest video in the world. Story will always be what people come for and importantly stick around for… though we still need to record the image using something!

Hardware

Your mobile phone is likely to be a good solution, especially now most of us have a smart phone capable of recording great images. Whether it’s an iPhone or Android most will have the ability to record pleasing video.

Keep it simple at first. Film during the day in a well-lit room with no background noise and you should get nice images.

Better still face the window (face into the light, not away from it) and as long as you are not in direct sunlight you’ll get an even exposure that won’t overwhelm your phone’s camera. If you can buy a plug-in directional mic this will improve your audio quality by reducing unwanted background noise.

Editing

There are many apps out there to choose from, but the one we have found that works well on both Android and iPhone is InShot. It is free to download and try, if you want to remove the watermark in the bottom of the frame, it’s less than £3 to buy the licensed version.

Using InShot (and most other apps) you can select clips from your camera roll, import them to the app and trim them down accordingly. You can raise or lower the audio level, add titles and graphics and even color grade the footage. But remember less is more!

From there you can export to your chosen social media channel of choice, all from your mobile device.

Video creation checklist

  1. Write Script/Scriptment
  2. Plan your shots
  3. Make sure there’s plenty of light
  4. Make sure you have good clean audio
  5. Do several clips, everyone makes mistakes
  6. Turn your personality up to 110% audiences love enthusiasm
  7. When finished choose your clips from your phone’s camera roll.
  8. Add them to the InShot timeline and trim them down and re-order them.
  9. Adjust audio and if needed the brightness/colour before adding titles.
  10. Export and upload to your chosen social media account.

Distribution

You’ve spent a long time on your project and it’s easy at this stage to forget about the importance of thumbnails, descriptions, tags and titles.

Using a website like Canva you can produce free great looking thumbnails that will have clarity and brightness, be the perfect size and aspect ratio, and look appealing to your audience.

Couple this with a catchy title, and a lengthy description full of keywords, an you are on your way to being discovered on YouTube. Hashtags and Tags are also important as it helps the server locate the answers to audience queries and serve up your video. Therefore, it’s key to make sure you don’t become too generic with your Tags and actually home in on what your particular niche audience is searching for.

VidIQ and TubeBuddy are great for helping you to identify areas in your description, tags and title that could do with being improved.

Where  next?

For equipment, here is a list of equipment that adds quality to your videos, although there are plenty more to choose from on the internet. We’ve provided Amazon links, though of course, these are widely available from a variety of retailers.

  1. Mic for Android – Amazon UK Link
  2. Mic for iPhone – Amazon UK Link
  3. Cage for supporting phone – Amazon UK Link
  4. Light – Amazon UK Link

And if you need more support, check out our very own video here on how to produce videos using a mobile phone.

Further Support:

The Digital Culture Network is here to support you and your organisation. If you need help or would like to chat with them about any of the advice they have covered above, please get in touch. Email digitalnetwork@artscouncil.org.uk with some background information about you, your location and your current dilemma, and they will connect you with one of our 9 Tech Champions for some in-depth 1-2-1 support.

Sign up to the DCN newsletter and follow us on Twitter @ace_dcn for latest updates.

Arts Council England allows Theatreis.Digital to republish this resource, under the terms of the Open Government Licence.

Find the resource in his original page here.

How to work remotely

The Digital Culture Network has created nine guides to help you succeed and thrive in the Digital World.  Here is the seventh guide: Remote Working Tools.

This resource gives you information and suggestions around some of the tools available to work remotely and collaborate with your colleagues.

How to and what is possible

Many of the tools have functionality for online chats, collaborative working and project management. We’ve highlighted some of the popular ones, but there are many more out there.

 

Tools available

Skillcrush have written a great blog where they talk about the tools mentioned here but also a lot of smaller ones that might be just what you’re looking for your organisation. These are 27 tools every new remote worker needs

Microsoft Teams

Microsoft Teams is part of the Office 365 suite, which you may already have. There is also a free version available. It is integrated seamlessly with O365 and is available as a phone and tablet app, desktop app, or can be access in your web browser. All three methods of accessing Teams are useful depending on where you are and what tech you have access to. There’s three main ways to use Teams:

  1. Video meetings – With geographically spread teams, it is important to be able to still have face-to-face meetings. If you can create a meeting in Outlook, you can create a meeting in Teams, as it is a very similar process. Up to 250 people can join a meeting from any location, offering a similar experience to Skype. You can blur your background for privacy, share your screen for presentations and record your meeting for future viewing.
  2. File sharing – Often documents are collaborative efforts, worked on by more than one person. With Teams you can access them anywhere and have confidence that the one you are working on is the latest and most up-to-date version. Any document saved to a team is accessible anywhere by members of the team. It also integrates with One Drive so all of your cloud-based files are accessible through the Teams interface. You can also set up individual channels and decide who can access key files, so you can maintain some level of security for more sensitive documents and any planning tools.
  3. Chat – many of us used to tools such as What’s App, Facebook Messenger as ways of keeping in touch with our friends and family. Teams has similar functionality which allows you to chat to the whole team, some team members, or a single person. It’s great feature for just staying in touch, and chat is also a great way at reducing email trails and keeping track of conversations. Teams uses a function called channels that allows you to separate out important team conversations from interpersonal chat.

Slack

Slack is a platform that is often highly rated by its users and offers similar functionality – meetings, chat and file sharing. There is a free version available, which limits usage to 1-2-1 meetings. For three or
more people in attendance you need the first paid tier which is around £5.00 per user per month.

Like most of the main players, you can integrate Slack with a lot of other apps including Outlook, Google Drive, Trello and many others. One of the benefits often cited for Slack is the ease of set up compared to
MS Teams. So, if you’re a technophobe, this might be the platform of choice.

Workplace by Facebook

Easy to use, as Facebook Workplace looks almost identical and uses a lot of same user interface elements
as it’s more public facing platform. Like Slack and Teams, Workplace allows you to have hassle free video meetings, group chat and share files. You can also broadcast via Facebook Live and work with other companies that also use the same platform. You’ve likely used Facebook Groups before and these are available in Workplace as well, so you have all conversations all in one place.

There is a powerful free version available and if you are a charity, their Advanced tier is also free. The main (and maybe only) con is that you must have a Facebook account to use the platform, though all personal activity is kept separate from business activity.

Best of the rest

Whatsapp and Skype are powerful tools for group chats. Google Hangouts and Google Drive offer similar functionality and have free options. And there are many more out there.

 

Further Support:

The Digital Culture Network is here to support you and your organisation. If you need help or would like to chat with them about any of the advice they have covered above, please get in touch. Email digitalnetwork@artscouncil.org.uk with some background information about you, your location and your current dilemma, and they will connect you with one of our 9 Tech Champions for some in-depth 1-2-1 support.

Sign up to the DCN newsletter and follow us on Twitter @ace_dcn for latest updates

Arts Council England allows Theatreis.Digital to republish this resource, under the terms of the Open Government Licence.

Find the resource in his original page here.